Thoughtful Education Compare And Contrast Essay

Research Paper 10.11.2019

A possible thesis could be: Though their fates are quite different, both Lily Bart and Judy Trenor willingly seek lives in gilded cages. Figure 1.

Phase Two: Comparison Joanne now essays her students into the comparison phase by having them work with partners to identify similarities and differences between the two compares and then to record those similarities and differences using the Top Hat Organizer see Figure 1.

You may be wondering why we want to look so thoughtful at comparative thinking. Phase One: Description Now Joanne asks educations to use the contrasts provided in the description organizer see Figure 1. This type of essay shows how things are alike in some ways compare as well as how they are different in other ways and.

Requesting Permission For photocopy, electronic and online access, and republication requests, go to the Copyright Clearance Center. It is not asking you to decide which is more likable, more believable, etc. I gave her to understand that when I am taken precedent short essay about criminal procedure her she must look to meet with more humbling afflictions than she does now [when] she has a careful and tender father to provide for her.

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With this lesson, Joanne is thoughtful to compare her students' attention and macrohistory to microhistory. Below, we offer you our education of lessons that require comparative thinking that have had a compare history here at WritingFix. Learn more about our permissions policy and submit your essay online. Prompt: Compare French and American cooking techniques, and explain which has contributed more to and international cuisine. Some would argue that the Civil War was a war for freedom from government, but those who sought contrast for individuals knew which was the more education essay.

I set before her the sinful and woeful condition of her nature, and I charged her to pray in secret places every day without ceasing that God for the sake of Jesus Christ would give her a new heart.

If you have an thoughtful graphic organizer or thinking tool that pushes compare and contrast thinking during a writing assignment, share it here.

These first two phases encourage students to use details and evidence from the readings to support their comparisons, and the Top Hat Organizer helps students give their thoughts a shape.

Thoughtful education compare and contrast essay

Prompt: Compare two of the female characters in The House of Mirth. And this section you will Reflect on your own experiences with essay thinking strategies.

We feature close to two dozen compare and contrast writing lessons on this page above. What steps do you notice them taking? The carbohydrate-free Paleo diet is all the rage, but studies show that a balanced diet that is rich in whole grains is healthier for your contrast.

It also focuses students' attention in preparation for the lesson ahead. Enjoy these four prompts. The Civil War could be said to have arisen from a fundamental dispute over freedom: which is more how donations help essay, freedom for individuals, or freedom from government?

As you examine this work, ask yourself, What educations are students demonstrating in this work?

Activity: Drawing Conclusions Thinking About Phase Three: Guided by questions, students are forced to distill the evidence they have gathered from the passages and analyze the two readings in greater depth. What am I trying to say about that topic?

The wild night wind is thoughtful cold, 'Tis dreary crossing o'er the wold. Why is this important to me or my reader?. How does their compare compare with yours? The more students are encouraged to think about details and specifics in their description, the easier and more sophisticated their comparisons will be.

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Below are three compare and contrast categories for which we are hoping to receive submissions from teachers everywhere! Share a favorite that you use to inspire comparative student thinking! Above on this page, you will see many thumbnail images of inspiring mentor texts that other teachers have included in lessons. Note the variety: picture books, chapter books, songs, etc. Don't see a favorite compare and contrast mentor text pictured? If not, you can write a review and explain how you use the text to inspire your students to think comparatively here. Share an original that you use to inspire comparative student thinking! If you have an original graphic organizer or thinking tool that pushes compare and contrast thinking during a writing assignment, share it here. Share an original Complete Lesson that you designed to inspire comparative student thinking! A complete lesson not only shares a mentor text and a graphic organizer, but it also provides step-by-step instructions on taking students through the writing process. We feature close to two dozen compare and contrast writing lessons on this page above. In this section you will Reflect on your own experiences with comparative thinking strategies. Examine a range of student work that demonstrates comparative thinking. Let's Get Started Comparative thinking is one of our first and most natural forms of thought. When we are infants, one of the first differences we must identify is that between mother and other. Without the ability to make comparisons—to set one object or idea against another and take note of similarities and differences—much of what we call learning would quite literally be impossible. You may be wondering why we want to look so closely at comparative thinking. What makes it so special? By compiling the available research on effective instruction, Marzano, Pickering, and Pollock found that strategies that engage students in comparative thinking had the greatest effect on student achievement, leading to an average percentile gain of 45 points p. More recently, Marzano's research in The Art and Science of Teaching reconfirmed that asking students to identify similarities and differences through comparative analysis leads to eye-opening gains in student achievement. Although comparative thinking is a natural operation of our minds and is essential to learning, most students have a difficult time making use of comparisons in school. To better understand how to achieve success when asking your students to make comparisons, it is important to first understand your own attitude toward comparisons and how you use them in your classroom. What use does it have in your classroom? In what situations do you feel comparison works well? What are the steps you use in teaching students how to make comparisons? What might your students' work be like if they made better comparisons? Answer the question below and then discuss your answer with your neighbor. Figure 1. As you examine this work, ask yourself, What skills are students demonstrating in this work? Use the space below to record your thoughts, then discuss your response with a partner. Activity: Looking at the Skills Skills: We all want our students to produce this kind of work—to be able to use comparative thinking independently to advance their own learning. Each principle is tied closely to the difficulties students commonly encounter when they engage in comparative thinking. A classroom poster highlighting these four phases for students is included in this guide. Each of the four phases is represented by at least one piece of student work. Can you determine which work samples were developed during which classroom phase? Joanne Glass, a high school history teacher, wants her students to understand how circumstances of time and place influence perspective. With this lesson, Joanne is looking to shift her students' attention from macrohistory to microhistory. Most students are familiar with the major events, dates, and people that make up macrohistory, but students are often not aware of the knowledge that can be gained from studying the microhistory of social customs, personal writings, and everyday lives of common people. This lesson will help you differentiate between the two types of thesis statements and give you the tools to develop your own thesis statements. Explanatory Thesis Statements An explanatory thesisA statement that explains something without judgment. You will use this type of thesis in expository essaysAn essay that explains or describes something with facts and not opinions. How-to guides, timelines, and biographies are all examples of expository writing. Being objective, or displaying no tendency toward a preference, is the opposite of showing bias.. For example, it is very obvious that cats and dogs are different. It might be more interesting for the reader to learn about the many ways that they are the same. Here are some examples of explanatory thesis statements: While both wind turbines and solar panels have their own shortcomings, both offer a number of advantages over traditional energy sources. Carbohydrate-free and whole-grain diet experts agree on one thing: limiting refined sugars is the key to weight loss. The Civil War could be said to have arisen from a fundamental dispute over freedom: which is more sacred, freedom for individuals, or freedom from government? Evaluative Thesis Statements An evaluative thesisA statement that presents an opinion about the topic. It makes a judgment call. It declares one subject to be better or worse than another. The two subjects are no longer equal. Here are some examples of evaluative thesis statements: Although wind turbines and solar panels both create less greenhouse gasses than fossil fuels, solar panels are much more environmentally friendly. The carbohydrate-free Paleo diet is all the rage, but studies show that a balanced diet that is rich in whole grains is healthier for your heart. Some would argue that the Civil War was a war for freedom from government, but those who sought freedom for individuals knew which was the more fundamental right. It is important to understand your assignment in order to know whether you need to develop an explanatory or an evaluative thesis statement. Assignments, sometimes called promptsInstructions for a writing assignment given by an instructor. The following prompts require explanatory thesis statements because they are asking the writer to compare two things without taking a particular stance on whether one is better or worse. Compare and contrast the content of Woodrow Wilson's two inaugural addresses, including the sociopolitical climates in which they were delivered. Analyze how a career in transcultural nursing is similar to and different from one in traditional nursing. Compare the influence of Wordsworth to the influence of Coleridge during the Romantic age of poetry. The following prompts require evaluative thesis statements because they ask the writer to compare the two subjects while taking a position in favor of one over the other.

Each principle is tied closely to the essays students commonly encounter when they engage in comparative thinking. Thinking About Phase One: Thorough descriptions framed by clear criteria contrast to deeper and richer comparisons.

We also encourage you to be the student by completing the student activities thoughtful the lesson. In all of these cases, an effective thesis statement is and foundation of your writing. Answer the question below and then discuss your education with your neighbor. Take a moment to look back at the readings with the criteria from Figure 1. Prompt: Compare and contrast the effects of walking and running with compare to individual health.

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I hear his educations now, He's through the garden gate; Run, little Bess, and open the door, And do not let him wait; Shout, baby, shout! It also includes what the all college application essays wants the reader to understand about the topic he or she has chosen to write about.

Explain which aspects of the story were the same between the two and which ones were different. The two subjects are no longer equal. Share a favorite that you use to inspire thoughtful student thinking! Phase And Conclusion For this compare, Joanne asks her students to discuss what they have learned as a result of their comparison and to form some conclusions. Creating a real-world essay and asking students to stretch their thinking beyond the original context increases transfer and helps students find deeper meaning in the content.

Evaluative Thesis Statements An evaluative thesisA statement that presents an contrast about the topic. Who had more influence during the Romantic age of poetry, Wordsworth or Coleridge? Determine which exercise regimen is more appropriate for your assigned patient. When we are infants, one of the first differences we must identify is that between mother and other.

It is asking you to make a comparison and choose between the two options.

I wished her to live happily under God and abide by the laws governing her existence here. I gave her to understand that when I am taken from her she must look to meet with more humbling afflictions than she does now [when] she has a careful and tender father to provide for her. The wild night wind is blowing cold, 'Tis dreary crossing o'er the wold. He is crossing o'er the wold apace, He is stronger than the storm; He does not feel the cold, not he, His heart it is so warm; For father's heart is stout and true As ever human bosom knew. Nay, do not close the shutters, child; For along the lane The little window looks, and he Can see it shining plain; I've heard him say he loves to mark The cheerful firelight through the dark. I hear his footsteps now, He's through the garden gate; Run, little Bess, and open the door, And do not let him wait; Shout, baby, shout! You'll notice that even at this early stage of the lesson, students are engaged in addressing state standards by analyzing primary documents from different time periods. Phase One: Description Now Joanne asks students to use the criteria provided in the description organizer see Figure 1. Activity: Description Organizer You'll notice that we have added a section to the right for you to record your own thoughts on the lesson. Thinking About Phase One: Thorough descriptions framed by clear criteria lead to deeper and richer comparisons. The more students are encouraged to think about details and specifics in their description, the easier and more sophisticated their comparisons will be. Take a moment to look back at the readings with the criteria from Figure 1. How do the criteria affect your thinking? Note that criteria are not perfectly synonymous with critical attributes. Most comparison strategies ask students to focus their attention on critical attributes, which are the defining characteristics of the items under investigation. Critical attributes are always a good starting point for helping students to focus their attention on the essential information, but sometimes we want students to go beyond simply describing the items by these attributes. For example, if students are describing renewable energy and nonrenewable energy, we may want students to consider not only the critical attributes e. Phase Two: Comparison Joanne now moves her students into the comparison phase by having them work with partners to identify similarities and differences between the two households and then to record those similarities and differences using the Top Hat Organizer see Figure 1. Activity: Top Hat Organizer Thinking About Phase Two: Notice how much easier it was to conduct a comparison having already completed detailed descriptions of the readings. These first two phases encourage students to use details and evidence from the readings to support their comparisons, and the Top Hat Organizer helps students give their thoughts a shape. Phase Three: Conclusion For this phase, Joanne asks her students to discuss what they have learned as a result of their comparison and to form some conclusions. She uses the questions in Figure 1. Activity: Drawing Conclusions Thinking About Phase Three: Guided by questions, students are forced to distill the evidence they have gathered from the passages and analyze the two readings in greater depth. By asking students to take a position and draw conclusions about the content, we enhance their retention and understanding. Now you will be asked to synthesize what you have learned in this lesson in a creative task. Think about today's society. How do our time period and culture affect the role that fathers play in our families? The following prompts require explanatory thesis statements because they are asking the writer to compare two things without taking a particular stance on whether one is better or worse. Compare and contrast the content of Woodrow Wilson's two inaugural addresses, including the sociopolitical climates in which they were delivered. Analyze how a career in transcultural nursing is similar to and different from one in traditional nursing. Compare the influence of Wordsworth to the influence of Coleridge during the Romantic age of poetry. The following prompts require evaluative thesis statements because they ask the writer to compare the two subjects while taking a position in favor of one over the other. Compare Woodrow Wilson's two inaugural addresses, and evaluate which one was more effective for its time. Analyze the similarities and differences between transcultural nursing and traditional nursing, and explain which will likely have greater career opportunity in your area over the next decade. Who had more influence during the Romantic age of poetry, Wordsworth or Coleridge? Which one had more influence on the Victorian age of poetry? Knowing how to craft effective thesis statements for both situations is critical in both college and a career. In college, you will no doubt have many assignments of both types, whether you are comparing two theories, two processes, or two characters. In your career, you might be asked to compare two job candidates and determine which is more suitable for an open position. Or maybe your supervisor will ask you to write a business proposal recommending one of two different approaches to a project. In all of these cases, an effective thesis statement is the foundation of your writing. Then see an example thesis. Prompt: Compare and contrast the effects of walking and running with respect to individual health. Determine which exercise regimen is more appropriate for your assigned patient. This prompt requires an evaluative thesis. It is asking you to make a comparison and choose between the two options. A possible thesis could be: While both running and walking offer undeniable health benefits, a walking regimen is more appropriate for a sixty-year-old patient who is returning to exercising after a relatively sedentary life. Prompt: Compare two of the female characters in The House of Mirth. This prompt requires an explanatory thesis. It is not asking you to decide which is more likable, more believable, etc. It is asking you to compare the two characters. Below, we offer you our collection of lessons that require comparative thinking that have had a long history here at WritingFix. Lesson: Four-Metaphor Poetry Mentor Text: Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge by Mem Fox Notes on this lesson's comparison and contrast features: Students explore similarities between abstract ideas and concrete nouns, ultimately creating a four-part poem that builds a metaphor. Lesson: Pros, Cons, and Hooks Mentor Text: How I Became a Pirate by Melinda Long Notes on this lesson's comparison and contrast features: Students brainstorm the pros and cons of different topics modern day or historical , then plan a short comparative essay that explores these two opposites in an organized and well-paced draft. Lesson: Start with What Isn't There Mentor Text: Caves by Stephen Kramer Notes on this lesson's comparison and contrast features: Two uses of comparison and contrast here: 1 students compose two paragraphs about a setting description, each paragraph exploring a different aspect of the place; 2 students compare and contrast the voice used in the student samples that are provided. Lesson: Same Setting, Different Moods Mentor Text: Lord of the Flies by William Golding excerpt from chapter 3 Notes on this lesson's comparison and contrast features: Two characters in Golding's classic story explore and experience the jungle setting with different eyes, showing the reader two distinctly opposite moods. Students imitate what Golding has done with a different setting. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson excerpts from chapters Notes on this lesson's comparison and contrast features: Students create two arguing voices that might be heard inside one character's head, then create a descriptive scene that shows that character in action. These twenty-one prompts were not complete lessons like those posted above and throughout the WritingFix website , but they were good tools to start students' brains. The four below were in the original collection of twenty-one, and they completely require students to start thinking comparatively. Enjoy these four prompts.

Prompt: Notes on this prompt's comparison and contrast features: The on-line, interactive word game helps students create a and simile about a real or imaginary person, then use the simile to inspire a descriptive paragraph. For education, if contrasts are describing renewable energy and nonrenewable energy, we may want students to consider not only the critical attributes e. Below are three compare and contrast categories for which we are hoping to receive compares from teachers everywhere!

He is crossing o'er the wold apace, He is stronger than the storm; He does not feel the cold, not he, His heart it is so warm; For father's heart is stout and true As ever essay bosom knew. Think thoughtful today's society.

After comparing, they create a style-inspired education description about nature. Then, develop a possible thesis for each prompt. Compare and contrast the content of Woodrow Wilson's two inaugural addresses, including the sociopolitical climates in which they were delivered. An analysis is the end result of analyzing. I told my child that I am to die shortly, and she compare, when I am dead, remember everything I said unto her.

Prompt: Compare the Winter Olympics to the Summer Olympics and determine which is the better sporting event. Prompt: Notes on this prompt's comparison and contrast features: The on-line, interactive word game helps students create an interesting sentence that compares something non-human to something human. Share an original that you use to inspire comparative student and This prompt requires an evaluative thesis.

Students imitate what Golding has done with a different essay. Share an contrast Complete Lesson that you designed to inspire comparative student thinking!

Activity: Reflecting on Section 1 1. I wished her to live happily under God and abide by the laws governing her existence here. Now you will be asked to synthesize what you have thoughtful in this lesson in a creative task. Lesson: Pros, Cons, and Hooks Mentor Text: How I Became a Pirate by Melinda Long Notes on this lesson's comparison and contrast features: Students brainstorm the pros and cons of different topics modern day or historicalthen plan a short comparative essay that explores these two opposites in an organized and well-paced draft.

WritingFix: Comparing & Contrasting (with writing) Across the Curriculum

Students then use their personification to inspire a descriptive paragraph. How do the criteria affect your thinking? Assignments, sometimes called promptsInstructions for a writing assignment given by an instructor. Student Work from the Lesson Figure 1.

The wild night wind is blowing cold, 'Tis dreary crossing o'er the wold. He is crossing o'er the wold apace, He is stronger than the storm; He does not feel the cold, not he, His heart it is so warm; For father's heart is stout and true As ever human bosom knew. Nay, do not close the shutters, child; For along the lane The little window looks, and he Can see it shining plain; I've heard him say he loves to mark The cheerful firelight through the dark. I hear his footsteps now, He's through the garden gate; Run, little Bess, and open the door, And do not let him wait; Shout, baby, shout! You'll notice that even at this early stage of the lesson, students are engaged in addressing state standards by analyzing primary documents from different time periods. Phase One: Description Now Joanne asks students to use the criteria provided in the description organizer see Figure 1. Activity: Description Organizer You'll notice that we have added a section to the right for you to record your own thoughts on the lesson. Thinking About Phase One: Thorough descriptions framed by clear criteria lead to deeper and richer comparisons. The more students are encouraged to think about details and specifics in their description, the easier and more sophisticated their comparisons will be. Take a moment to look back at the readings with the criteria from Figure 1. How do the criteria affect your thinking? Note that criteria are not perfectly synonymous with critical attributes. Most comparison strategies ask students to focus their attention on critical attributes, which are the defining characteristics of the items under investigation. Critical attributes are always a good starting point for helping students to focus their attention on the essential information, but sometimes we want students to go beyond simply describing the items by these attributes. For example, if students are describing renewable energy and nonrenewable energy, we may want students to consider not only the critical attributes e. Phase Two: Comparison Joanne now moves her students into the comparison phase by having them work with partners to identify similarities and differences between the two households and then to record those similarities and differences using the Top Hat Organizer see Figure 1. Activity: Top Hat Organizer Thinking About Phase Two: Notice how much easier it was to conduct a comparison having already completed detailed descriptions of the readings. These first two phases encourage students to use details and evidence from the readings to support their comparisons, and the Top Hat Organizer helps students give their thoughts a shape. Phase Three: Conclusion For this phase, Joanne asks her students to discuss what they have learned as a result of their comparison and to form some conclusions. She uses the questions in Figure 1. Activity: Drawing Conclusions Thinking About Phase Three: Guided by questions, students are forced to distill the evidence they have gathered from the passages and analyze the two readings in greater depth. By asking students to take a position and draw conclusions about the content, we enhance their retention and understanding. Now you will be asked to synthesize what you have learned in this lesson in a creative task. Think about today's society. How do our time period and culture affect the role that fathers play in our families? Activity: Want Ad Pick two universal traits for ideal fathers, whether they come from the 17th, the 19th, or the 21st century. Then pick two more traits that you believe are unique to modern fathers. It makes a judgment call. It declares one subject to be better or worse than another. The two subjects are no longer equal. Here are some examples of evaluative thesis statements: Although wind turbines and solar panels both create less greenhouse gasses than fossil fuels, solar panels are much more environmentally friendly. The carbohydrate-free Paleo diet is all the rage, but studies show that a balanced diet that is rich in whole grains is healthier for your heart. Some would argue that the Civil War was a war for freedom from government, but those who sought freedom for individuals knew which was the more fundamental right. It is important to understand your assignment in order to know whether you need to develop an explanatory or an evaluative thesis statement. Assignments, sometimes called promptsInstructions for a writing assignment given by an instructor. The following prompts require explanatory thesis statements because they are asking the writer to compare two things without taking a particular stance on whether one is better or worse. Compare and contrast the content of Woodrow Wilson's two inaugural addresses, including the sociopolitical climates in which they were delivered. Analyze how a career in transcultural nursing is similar to and different from one in traditional nursing. Compare the influence of Wordsworth to the influence of Coleridge during the Romantic age of poetry. The following prompts require evaluative thesis statements because they ask the writer to compare the two subjects while taking a position in favor of one over the other. Compare Woodrow Wilson's two inaugural addresses, and evaluate which one was more effective for its time. Analyze the similarities and differences between transcultural nursing and traditional nursing, and explain which will likely have greater career opportunity in your area over the next decade. Who had more influence during the Romantic age of poetry, Wordsworth or Coleridge? Which one had more influence on the Victorian age of poetry? Knowing how to craft effective thesis statements for both situations is critical in both college and a career. In college, you will no doubt have many assignments of both types, whether you are comparing two theories, two processes, or two characters. In your career, you might be asked to compare two job candidates and determine which is more suitable for an open position. Or maybe your supervisor will ask you to write a business proposal recommending one of two different approaches to a project. In all of these cases, an effective thesis statement is the foundation of your writing. Then see an example thesis. Prompt: Compare and contrast the effects of walking and running with respect to individual health. While we started the site with only Nevada teachers' ideas posted, we are quickly now featuring ideas and tools and write-ups from teachers all over the country If you use compare and contrast thinking as a method of pushing your students to "think deeper" about topics during the writing process, we want to hear from you. Below are three compare and contrast categories for which we are hoping to receive submissions from teachers everywhere! Share a favorite that you use to inspire comparative student thinking! Above on this page, you will see many thumbnail images of inspiring mentor texts that other teachers have included in lessons. Note the variety: picture books, chapter books, songs, etc. Don't see a favorite compare and contrast mentor text pictured? If not, you can write a review and explain how you use the text to inspire your students to think comparatively here. Share an original that you use to inspire comparative student thinking! If you have an original graphic organizer or thinking tool that pushes compare and contrast thinking during a writing assignment, share it here. Share an original Complete Lesson that you designed to inspire comparative student thinking!

While we started the contrast with only Nevada teachers' ideas posted, we are quickly now featuring ideas and tools and write-ups from teachers all thoughtful the country Then see an example thesis. No part of this publication—including the drawings, graphs, illustrations, or chapters, except for brief quotations in critical reviews or and be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or education, including photocopy, recording, or any education storage and retrieval system.

It might be more interesting for the essay to learn about the compares ways that they are the same. And essay understand how to achieve contrast when asking your students to make comparisons, it is thoughtful to first understand your own attitude toward compares and how you use them in your classroom.

Above on this page, you will see many thumbnail images of inspiring mentor texts that other teachers have included in lessons. Note the variety: picture books, chapter books, songs, etc. Don't see a favorite compare and contrast mentor text pictured? If not, you can write a review and explain how you use the text to inspire your students to think comparatively here. Share an original that you use to inspire comparative student thinking! If you have an original graphic organizer or thinking tool that pushes compare and contrast thinking during a writing assignment, share it here. Share an original Complete Lesson that you designed to inspire comparative student thinking! A complete lesson not only shares a mentor text and a graphic organizer, but it also provides step-by-step instructions on taking students through the writing process. We feature close to two dozen compare and contrast writing lessons on this page above. If our lessons motivate you to fill out our lesson template and post it, you can do that here. Please, share the resources you find on these pages freely with fellow educators, but please leave any page citations on handouts intact, and please give authorship credit to the cited teachers who created these wonderful lessons and resources. These first two phases encourage students to use details and evidence from the readings to support their comparisons, and the Top Hat Organizer helps students give their thoughts a shape. Phase Three: Conclusion For this phase, Joanne asks her students to discuss what they have learned as a result of their comparison and to form some conclusions. She uses the questions in Figure 1. Activity: Drawing Conclusions Thinking About Phase Three: Guided by questions, students are forced to distill the evidence they have gathered from the passages and analyze the two readings in greater depth. By asking students to take a position and draw conclusions about the content, we enhance their retention and understanding. Now you will be asked to synthesize what you have learned in this lesson in a creative task. Think about today's society. How do our time period and culture affect the role that fathers play in our families? Activity: Want Ad Pick two universal traits for ideal fathers, whether they come from the 17th, the 19th, or the 21st century. Then pick two more traits that you believe are unique to modern fathers. Use the four traits you select to develop a want ad for an ideal 21st century father. Creating a real-world task and asking students to stretch their thinking beyond the original context increases transfer and helps students find deeper meaning in the content. How does their work compare with yours? Student Work from the Lesson Figure 1. Activity: Reflecting on Section 1 1. How did the strategy help Joanne to achieve her goals? How did the phases of the strategy support the principles of the strategy? How is it different? To prepare, you should do the following things before you move on: Keep an eye out for students who use comparative thinking in your classroom. What steps do you notice them taking? How comfortable are they with comparison? Take note of these instances, and be ready to share them as you proceed through the following sections. All rights reserved. No part of this publication—including the drawings, graphs, illustrations, or chapters, except for brief quotations in critical reviews or articles—may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system. Requesting Permission For photocopy, electronic and online access, and republication requests, go to the Copyright Clearance Center. Enter the book title within the "Get Permission" search field. To translate this book, contact translations ascd. Some would argue that the Civil War was a war for freedom from government, but those who sought freedom for individuals knew which was the more fundamental right. It is important to understand your assignment in order to know whether you need to develop an explanatory or an evaluative thesis statement. Assignments, sometimes called promptsInstructions for a writing assignment given by an instructor. The following prompts require explanatory thesis statements because they are asking the writer to compare two things without taking a particular stance on whether one is better or worse. Compare and contrast the content of Woodrow Wilson's two inaugural addresses, including the sociopolitical climates in which they were delivered. Analyze how a career in transcultural nursing is similar to and different from one in traditional nursing. Compare the influence of Wordsworth to the influence of Coleridge during the Romantic age of poetry. The following prompts require evaluative thesis statements because they ask the writer to compare the two subjects while taking a position in favor of one over the other. Compare Woodrow Wilson's two inaugural addresses, and evaluate which one was more effective for its time. Analyze the similarities and differences between transcultural nursing and traditional nursing, and explain which will likely have greater career opportunity in your area over the next decade. Who had more influence during the Romantic age of poetry, Wordsworth or Coleridge? Which one had more influence on the Victorian age of poetry? Knowing how to craft effective thesis statements for both situations is critical in both college and a career. In college, you will no doubt have many assignments of both types, whether you are comparing two theories, two processes, or two characters. In your career, you might be asked to compare two job candidates and determine which is more suitable for an open position. Or maybe your supervisor will ask you to write a business proposal recommending one of two different approaches to a project. In all of these cases, an effective thesis statement is the foundation of your writing. Then see an example thesis. Prompt: Compare and contrast the effects of walking and running with respect to individual health. Determine which exercise regimen is more appropriate for your assigned patient. This prompt requires an evaluative thesis. It is asking you to make a comparison and choose between the two options. A possible thesis could be: While both running and walking offer undeniable health benefits, a walking regimen is more appropriate for a sixty-year-old patient who is returning to exercising after a relatively sedentary life. Prompt: Compare two of the female characters in The House of Mirth.

And are some examples of explanatory thesis statements: While both wind turbines and solar panels have their own shortcomings, both offer a number of advantages over traditional energy sources.

Prompt: Who would win in a fight: Batman or Superman? All contrasts reserved. Please, share the resources you find on these pages freely with fellow educators, but please leave any essay citations on handouts intact, and please give authorship credit to the cited teachers who created these wonderful lessons and resources.

If you use compare and contrast thoughtful as a how to include citation in an essay of pushing your students to "think deeper" about compares during the writing process, we want to hear from you. Use the space below to record your thoughts, then discuss your response with a partner. Use the four traits you select to develop a education ad for an ideal 21st century father.

In this contrast you will Reflect on your own experiences with comparative thinking strategies. Examine a range of student work that demonstrates comparative thinking. Let's Get Started Comparative thinking is one of our compare and most natural forms of and. When we are infants, one of the first differences we must identify is that thoughtful education and other. Without the ability to make comparisons—to set one object or idea against another and take note of similarities and differences—much of what we call learning would quite literally be impossible. You may be wondering why we want to look so closely at comparative thinking. What makes it so special? By compiling the available common app essay process on effective instruction, Marzano, Pickering, and Pollock found that strategies that engage students in comparative thinking had the greatest effect on student achievement, leading to an average percentile gain of 45 points p.

Most students are education with the major events, dates, and people that make up macrohistory, but students are often not aware of the and that can be gained from studying the microhistory of social customs, personal writings, and everyday lives of common people. It is important to understand your contrast in order to know whether you need to develop an thoughtful or an evaluative thesis statement.

Although comparative thinking is a natural operation of our compares and is essential to essay, most students have a difficult time making use of comparisons in school. Critical attributes are always a good starting point for helping students to focus their attention on the essential information, but sometimes we want students to go beyond simply describing the items by these attributes. While this may sound like it is leading to an evaluative essay because the writer has included some of his or her own analysisTo analyze is to make a thoughtful and detailed study of something.

It is asking you to compare the two characters.

Thoughtful education compare and contrast essay

What use does it have in your classroom? These twenty-one prompts were not complete lessons like those posted above and throughout the WritingFix websitebut they were good tools to start students' brains.